USNM 37440 Cones of Sequoia sp.?  

Notes

Hollick (1930)

Pl. 23 Fig. 10

 

Locality

From Hollick (1930) (p. 59)

"Yukon River, north bank, about 3 miles above Kaltag (original No. 3AH28); collected by Arthur Hllick and Sidney Paige in 1903 (lot 3267) (pl. 20, fig. 8). Yukon River, north bank, just above Pickart's mine (original No. 3AH18a); collected by Arthur Hollick and Sidney Paige in 1903 (lot 3254) (pl. 20, fig. 9). Yukon River, north bank, about 7 miles below Blatchford's mine (original No. 3AH20); collected by Arthur Hollick and Sidney Paige in 1903 (lot 3259) (pl. 23, figs. 1, 8). Yukon River, north bank, about 10 miles below Blatchford's mine (original No. 8AH23); collected by Arthur Hollick and Sidney Paige in 1903 (lot 3262) (pl. 23, figs. 2-3). Yukon River, north bank, about 12 miles below Melozi telegraph station (original No. 3AH11); collected by Arthur Hollick and Sidney Paige in 1903 (lot 3248) (pl. 23, figs. 4-7). Yukon River, north bank, about 13 miles below Melozi telegraph station (original No. 3AH12); collected by Arthur Hollick and Sidney Paige in 1903 (lot 3249) (pl. 23, fig. 9). Yukon River, north bank, about 17 miles below Nulato (original No. 33); collected by W. W. Atwood and H. M. Eakin in 1907 (lot 4639) (pl. 23, fig. 10). '

 

Locality Map

 

Description

From Hollick (1930) (p. 59)

"Plate 20, Figures 8-9; Plate 23, Figures 1-10"

"Immature, mature, and more or less disintegrated cones are present in most of the collections from the Yukon River region that contain the leafy twigs and branches of one or another of the species of Sequoia described in the preceding pages; but it is very difficult
to identify any of them satisfactorily with any particular species."

 

Remarks

From Hollick (1930) (p. 59)

"Figure 8 on Plate 20 apparently represents a branch with immature cones and without any leaves by which it might be identified, and it may belong to some coniferous genus other than Sequoia.

Figure 9 on the same plate represents a branch with old, partly disintegrated cones, relatively small in size, and a few obscurely defined leaves, both of which are suggestive of S. fastigiata (Sternberg) Heer.

Figures 1 and 8 on Plate 23 are included in the same collection with the leafy twigs represented by Figures 7 and 8 on Plate 22, which are referred to S. concinna Heer; and in connection with Figure 1 may be seen some fragmentary remains of leafy twigs that might be provisionally referred to that species.

Figures 2 and 3 on Plate 23 possess no distinctive features by means of which they may be satisfactorily differentiated from the specimens last mentioned.

Figures 4-7 on Plate 23 are included in the collection that contains the leafy twigs represented by Figures 3 and 4 on Plate 22 and Figure 4 on Plate 27, referred to S. reichenbachi (Geinitz) Heer; and in connection with the cones in Figures 4 and 6 may be seen fragmentary leafy twigs that are somewhat suggestive of that species.

Figure 9 on Plate 20 is included in the same collection with the leafy twigs represented by Figures 2-4 on Plate 21, referred to S. fastigiata; but the leaves attached to the branch that supports the cone are more like those of S. concinna.

Figure 10 on Plate 23 is from the same collection that contains the leafy twigs represented in Figure 6 on Plate 22, referred to S. concinna.

The difficulty of any attempt to identify these cones definitely with those of described species of Sequoia, unless they are found actually attached to leafy twigs, may be appreciated by comparing them with certain of the published figures of S. fastigiata (Heer 1869 (pl. 1, figs. 12, 13); 1882 (pl. 3, figs. 8, 9; pl. 41 fig. 5); 1883 (pl. 51, fig.11); Lesquereux 1876 (p. 335, pl. 3, fig. 2); Velenovsky 1885 (pl. 1, figs. 1 - 5)), S. concinna (Heer 1883) (pl. 51, figs. 2, 3 in part, 3b, 4 - 8, 10), and S. reichenbachi (Heer 1869) (pl. 1, figs. 1 - 5), many of which appear to be specifically interchangeable.

If specimens should be found in which cones are definitely associated with identifiable foliage a differentiation of our figured specimens into recognized species might be feasible; but under existing conditions any such attempt would be purely arbitrary."